Sunday, October 15, 2006

About GTDrawings

Whenever I’m reading something, and it doesn’t really matter what, be it a breathtaking novel or a boring manual, I just can’t help myself doodling and sketching whatever comes to my mind —and to my hands.

Sometimes the drawings have something to do with what I’m currently reading, sometimes they don’t. They may be completely unrelated. Some of the sketches are detailed representations of some character or situation, with detailed line or textural work and details; others are more careless and impulsive.

Reading David’s Allen Getting Things Done has been no exception. Being such a succesful and enthusiastically envangelised book, I was compelled to create these visual side notes.

Here they are. I’ll post a selection of the sketches (around fifty) and derivative works. The images are available under a Creative Commons licence (see below). Read the licence terms for detailed usage information.



If you want me to create more polished, vectorised or colour versions of these drawings, please contact me for a quote.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 License.

2 comments:

Debbie Chinique said...

Loving these! It is interesting to see how you visualize each concept. I especially like the "clear/unclear mind".

Del DeVries said...

Your sketches and drawings are stunning!!! What an outstanding method for visualization of the GtD concepts.

Thank you for sharing your creativity!

1000 Heads: the book

1000 heads, my illustration book

My artwork at Flickr

Inspiring books for the creative type

My GTD (Getting things done) illustrations

I conceived this blog basically to share my visual side notes of the Getting things done process. My most recent posts about GTD software and related topics have “masked” the original posts.

You can access most GTDrawings in the archive of december 2005 and january 2006.

Here's a miniature with most of my sketches: this is what you will find, commented and in larger sizes, in those previous posts.

See also the article about GTD drawings.

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